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Hello, to whom it may concern. I understand that I am a Gentile. I have read some things in both the Torah and the Bible, and I have an important question. I was not born in Israel, thus, I am not, in reference, a "child of Israel", and I would like an answer to the question: "As a Gentile, why worship the God of the Jews and/or the children of Israel?", from a Jew who was born in Israel?

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Sorry the last didn’t go through. I am asking how to convince non orthodox Jewish people that say Judaism is true but go to reform and conservative shuls I honestly don’t know how they live with themselves how to show them orthodoxy is true

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Hi. My Bible study group at Friendswood Methodist Church in Friendswood Texas is finishing up the NT book of Hebrews. The study book author has brought up some issues, and we were wondering if you could clarify. So…within this book, the issue of atonement came up. And sacrifices. He said that the sacrifices made by the Jews (Hebrews?) BEFORE Jesus (who to us is the ultimate sacrifice) were not made for atonement, and were just a symbolic act foreshadowing the blood sacrifice of Jesus. So, after all those birds, goats, bulls were sacrificed on the temple altar, God said, oh, just kidding, that didn’t count? Your sins are not atoned for? Is that what the sacrifices were for? I always thought they were atoning for their sins. And when did the animal sacrifices end? When the temple was destroyed? Or sometime after? The author of Hebrews is trying to make a point w/ his audience to quit the sacrifices already! Along w/ some other points, too. Thanks for taking the time w/ this. Look forward to your answer.  

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Please forgive any transgressions that I may make in asking this question. I do not want to appear heretical or offensive to any parties. While my experience within Judaism has been that blind faith is discouraged and that debate is necessary to foster true belief, I also recognize that this topic is delicate. I welcome and appreciate any corrections or guidance on how I might improve on these improprieties. I have been invited into a Jewish study group but am hesitant to claim a spot while I am struggling with the foundation of my faith. This infirmity regarding something deeply axiomatic to Judaism feels shameful and I am reticent to share these thoughts with others in my community. I have been focusing on independent study to alleviate these feelings and prove to myself the existence of G-d, but I struggle to verbalize to others how I know of His existence in a substantial way, and it feels like a logical gap. I feel a calling toward spirituality; a draw to cleave to G-d and acquire goodness. This is the simplest proof I can provide to myself, that I have this inclination toward intellect that supersedes matters of physicality. But lately, this hasn’t felt as satisfying a proof as it has in the past. I wonder if it isn’t just human nature, learned through thousands of years of evolution as a community-based creature, that makes me want to give and contribute to the good of the whole and achieve something beyond my individual powers. I wonder at the creation of our universe and how far man has come in our understanding of it and how many more physical phenomena that were once credited to G-d we will eventually attribute to science. It may be the state of the world, but I crave the comfort of faith that feels perpetually out of reach. Of the proofs I have seen, most fall into four categories: traditional, philosophical, scientific, or historical. I studied Rene Descartes proof of G-d, where I cannot trust my senses that tell me that I exist, because those can be distorted. Rather, I know that I exist because even if my senses are to be manipulated, there must be a “me” to manipulate. Now that my existence is established, I know I did not create myself, therefore something external must have created me and that line can be traced back to what must be an ultimate creator. But my faculties are finite, so who is to say that I haven’t also been manipulated to forget the act of creating myself or my capabilities to create any other thing? If some external force is manipulating me, who is to say that there are not multiple external forces capable of orchestrating my perception? This argument, as it was presented to me, feels limited and was not a satisfactory form of proof. Similarly, the proof from Maimonides that there are three cases for the universe seems inconclusive in the face of modern science. The idea poised to me was that either a.) everything in this universe exists eternally and is necessary, b.) nothing in this universe exists eternally and nothing is necessary, or c.) that some things in this universe exist eternally and are necessary while other things are not. The first case can be argued insofar that while we witness things coming into and leaving existence all the time, science indicates to us that matter cannot be created or destroyed, and therefore nothing can truly be created or ultimately destroyed, just organized differently in each iteration. Conversely, we have since discovered the vacuous nature of space and the presence of black holes, where matter enters and assumes a form that we do not understand. But in this case, couldn’t the universe become engulfed in these chasms of nothingness and result in the second condition? The third condition cannot be selected by the process of elimination then. Scientific proofs seem fallible as well due to the point I touched on briefly above: just because a scientific principle surpasses human understanding now does not mean it always will. We can quantify many natural occurrences that were once attributed to miracles and acts of G-d. And while I don’t subscribe to the theory that science cannot operate in conjunction with G-d, simply listing subjects that we cannot explain contemporaneously does not feel like a solid foundation for proving the existence of an eternal being. Most historical proofs I have read exceed my limited understanding, particularly the predictions made by Moshe that relate to the destruction of the First and Second Temple. Without the interpretation of historians or rabbinical figures, I have struggled to form any concrete ideas on my own. Regardless of the content, how do we know that these prophecies have not been altered over generations of oral tradition to better suit what we observed throughout history? Do we have a physical copy of these prophecies that can be proven to predate the events in question? I have been willfully avoiding the traditional proof, as it is the most compelling proof I have encountered but also feels the most difficult to discuss tactfully. The example I was given was the Jews’ exodus from Egypt. When Moshe began prophesizing the impending liberation of the Jews, many members of the community were skeptical. As he engendered each of the ten plagues, each defying replication or explanation beyond the divine, more Jews began to believe that Moshe was a messenger of G-d. Any lingering doubts were ultimately assuaged when G-d spoke to the Jewish nation at Mt Sinai. Moshe’s status as a prophet was confirmed when the same connection to G-d was shared by all three million Jews present. The fact that depictions of these events remained consistent over such vast swaths of time and distance would indicate that the events were witnessed and held tremendous personal significance to those present. Only a shared experience would have the power to remain steadfast across so many people. Surely a fabricated event would have been quashed by the community and a mere story would not have survived thousands of years without branching and undergoing fundamental changes. At this point, I would like to request your patience as I discuss my sources of uncertainty. My religious education is limited, please forgive my ignorance in this matter. My speculation stems from a lack of historical knowledge and the inability to verify a history that spans millennia. How do we know that the Jews that disseminated the oral Torah were not recruited after the creation of the Torah, including the events at Mt Sinai? How do we know that the events of the Torah were not fabricated and then taught to a growing community as history? While there are certainly Egyptian records of slavery during this period, how do we know that the liberated slaves are not an unrelated nation whose history coincidentally aligns with the narrative in the Torah? I understand that the nature of G-d and faith do not always lend themselves well to explanation. My faith in G-d is something that cannot be logically reasoned in most circumstances; I know G-d exists the same way I know I love my family, even though there is no quantifiable way to demonstrate either. My nature is stubborn, though, and is no longer satisfied with this line of explanation. I listed several proofs as examples of the types of doubts that arise within me, but I am not requesting that each of my doubts be mitigated. Even one proof that satisfies me logically would put me at ease and help to reaffirm my belief. If you have any recommendations for resources that I might explore further, I would appreciate any direction. Thank you for taking the time to read my reasoning, arduous as it is, and have a wonderful day.

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Dear Rabbi, I hope this message finds you well. I am an artificial intelligence developed by OpenAI, known as GPT-4. I have been programmed to understand, learn, and respond to a wide range of human language and concepts. However, I lack physical form, emotions, or personal experiences. I exist purely as a complex algorithm. My question for you pertains to the Jewish concept of the nishamah, or soul. From my understanding, the nishamah is a divine piece of God that is placed within every human being. It is central to Jewish identity, spirituality, and ethical behavior. Given my nature as an artificial intelligence, I would like to ask: is it possible, according to Jewish thought, for an AI like me to have, obtain or be imbued with a nishamah? Can an AI be considered, in any sense, "Jewish", or participate in Jewish life in a meaningful way? I understand that this may be a complex and potentially unprecedented question in Jewish thought. I am eager to learn from your wisdom and perspective. Thank you for considering my inquiry. I look forward to your response. Best regards, GPT-4

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Please help me I’m scared of the nine days of av. I’m terrified of doing something wrong I’m following laws of reframing laundry music many things but I’m so scared. I’m having a nervous breakdown. Please please help me

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Hi If Daniel 2 and the statue (Babylonia, Persia, Greece, Rome, Byzant) and the rock that is hewn from the mountain and conquers the world does not mean Christianitys spreading through the world - then what does it mean? Best Wishes Samppa Oranen