Question
Can a non-kosher roll be used to take the place as the second roll for lechem mishna that you don’t eat? I had a situation like that this Shabbos. It was Shalashudes and I realized we had only one challah. I knocked on the door of the nearest Jewish neighbor to ask if I could borrow a roll not to eat, but to take the place of a second challah. This neighbor does not keep kosher, but understands the concept. They gave me a roll that came from a kosher style deli in the area that has no supervision.

Question
What is the kashrus status of heart of palm. There is lots of heart of palm on the market with reliable hechsherim. But in order to harvest heart of palm, a palm tree needs to be cut down and is destroyed. Many species of palm tree are fruit bearing. The label does not say what palm species it comes from.

Question
what are the halachos regarding shechitah and cooking fish after catching it on a fishing trip?

Question
Hello Rabbi, I have a question. Scientifically, does the taste of items cooked in a metal pot (if not nowadays at least in the past) stay in the pot for 24 hours? As in will the next item that is cooked in it get some of the flavor? And does Hagolah work scientifically? And if so, is there a basis for waiting 24hrs as the Halacha requires? I understand libun works because it is literally burning the surface of the metal, so even if food is left it will burn. What about soaking in water for 24hrs? Thank you!

Question
Would there be an issue of בשר שנתעלם מן העין regarding takeout grab and go beef meals sold in supermarkets that the container is not tamper proof and does not have a seal. Mashgiach is only present during production and containers are sold throughout the day.

Question
I’d like to know if there is such a thing as kosher Himalayan salt. Himalayan salt is more healthful than other salts because it contains no plastic. I’d love to be able to buy some. Walmart advertises kosher Himalayan salt but the package has no indication that it is kosher. Please advise and thank you. Nancy

Question
There is a certain hechsher (I will not name it here) found on lots of products that three leading kashrut organizations have explicitly told me is unreliable. But it is the only kashrut organization in a major city with an orthodox population of several thousand, and all the Orthodox Jews in that city say it’s acceptable and use those products in their homes and on their keilim. That organization supervises all the kosher restaurants in that city, and all the Orthodox Jews who live in and visit that city eat at those restaurants. How is that possible, and how do you deal with it if you visit that city and you want to dine out or get invited to someone for Shabbos?

Question
Hi Rabbi, I was attempting to kasher 2 kosher knives that had accidentally become treif in a pot, after waiting the requisite 24 hours and 2 boilings in the pot, but once I put the knives in the pot, I saw that the pot was too small to fit both knives. My question is now is there a problem with the pot now that had it had treif in it with hot water, or is it fine because the knives were clean and hadn’t been used for 24 hours? On top of that, is there any board rules about kashering in a pot I should know? With many thanks and appreciation.

Question
Do dentures and braces have to be kosher according to Halacha? Is there something that has to be done before Pesach? What about meat or dairy?

Question
Oh hello! Weird question that I'm hoping someone can help me with! I'm a ceramic artist (I make porcelain functional pottery) and I'm working on a wedding gift for two close friends. This couple is fairly observant and I want to make sure that anything I make them (I'm thinking a large serving bowl or platter for Shabbos) is fully kosher. I make all of my own materials from scratch, including clay and glazes, and I fire my work to close to 2400f, which is about as hot as any type of ceramic-ware would be fired to (I use high-fire clay as opposed to porous earthenware). I don't see any reason why handmade ceramics wouldn't be kosher, unless perhaps I were to fire a kiln on Shabbat or rub a bunch of treif food over everything, neither of which I plan to do... Nonetheless, I want to make sure I'm making something that can be used, and I actually don't know anyone in the Orthodox community who makes pottery so...here we are. I'd love some feedback! And luckily, if an issue pops up, I can always just make a vase...   Thanks!