Question
It seems strange that we have to go through unusual measures to search for bugs in our fruits and vegetables. Some fruits/vegetables are not permitted at all, some we can only eat if an expert examined them and certified them kosher, and others I can eat if I use a thrip cloth, light box, etc. Is this something new? (Did the Rambam eat fruits and vegetables? He didn't own a light box.) Or have some groups within the Jewish community taken this to an extreme level and these restrictions are not totally necessary? Thank you.

Question
Normally a non-Jew cannot be the only one involved in the cooking process in order for it to be considered bishul yisrael, rather a shomer Shabbos Jew must be involved at some point in the process. My question is if this applies to par baked items as well, which are items that have already been cooked, just not fully. Would the same apply?

Question
Hello Rabbi, I recently came to the realization that if an animal is slaughtered and the chalaf is found to have notches in it, thus rendering the animal not kosher, then the animal, naturally, may not be consumed. The animal at this point has already been killed. It has suffered, because the chalaf had a notch in it. Its death likely involved some form of pain, even if slight and lasting only for an instant. This animal's death was a tragedy, but it has occurred in the manner in which it has occurred. Why waste it? Why do we waste the life of this animal, who died painfully because of a mistake made by the slaughter or a defect in the tool used for the slaughter? What are we to do with the meat of this animal, and how are we to honor it, after what has been done to it? I cannot understand how G-d would want us to throw out the animal after it has suffered, as that would make its death meaningless.

Question
Asker A* wrote: Dear Rabbi, I've had gefilte fish at Orthodox homes, where the fish plate and silverware were removed before the chicken soup and meat were served. Why must the meat and fish be separated? Asker B* wrote: Could you please explain the prohibition of eating fish and cheese together? I would like to know where this law/custom is derived from as I have been told that it is a Chassidic custom. Also, if it is a Chassidic custom and, seeing as though I'm not Chassidic, even if I have been observing this custom for many years under the impression that it was mandatory, do I still have to continue with it? Thanks!