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The shoresh of the Hebrew word for war, מלחמה, is לחם, bread. What is the connection between bread and war?

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Shalom aleichem Rabbi Lauffer. Thank you for answering my last question. Rashi explains that Egyptian women were black and ugly. Why then, was it such a nisayon for Yosef to resist the seduction of Potiphar's wife to sleep with him, to the point where his only recourse was to release his zerah by stuffing his fingers into the ground? Why was it such a nisayon to resist such an ugly woman? Do any of the meforshim address this? Thanks.

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I am currently studying ancient religions and comparing them to what we read in the Torah. The result shows God is far more interactive than I ever imagined. I used to think the second commandment was merely about not making idols, but now I think it is part of one of the most tear-inducing messages of love. However, I need to know if what I think the verse means is what the verse truly means. At that time in Egypt, the concept of people loving their god or a god loving his people was nonexistent. You could feel joy or awe but love was not in the mix. Plus, gods were bound geographically. The farther they got from their city, the weaker they became. Oh… and they also wondered around like yard dogs, got lost and took naps at inconvenient times. So to get a god where you wanted… say, on a battlefield… and doing what you wanted… winning the war… you had to use an idol to act as a sort of leash to drag him along. Then through rituals and the use of his “true name”, you could force him to fight the other side’s god while your soldiers fought their soldiers. Although they had “sabbath” days, these were unlucky day, like Friday the 13th, and so people didn’t work and priests did rituals because bad things happen on these days. While I think I understand the rest of the verses, I need to understand if I understand the second commandment clearly. Not merely, do not make an idol, but rather, “Do not try to manipulate me or any other god you wish to turn to instead of coming to me.” In a world where all gods must be bribed and manipulated, God was building a personal relationship where He wasn’t going to play games. Am I understanding correctly or am a missing something?

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If an animal is walking in the reshus harabim and eats from items there, it is classified as shein, the owner is patur from damages, but has to pay the benefit he received from not feeding his animal. If the animal turns his head to the side of the reshus harabim and eats items there, it is classified as keren, and if the animal is a tam, the owner pays half damages (chatzi nezek). My question is: What happens if the chatzi nezek amount is less than the value the owner would pay for benefit in the case of shein? Do we say that the benefit amount is an overall minimum payment in all cases, or paying any amount of damages absolves the owner of paying for benefit?

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Dear Rabbi, I grew up with almost no background in Judaism but recent events in Israel have prompted me to learn more about my heritage. Any advice for me? Thank you

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I was curious rabbis why so many people accuse haredi and hasidic Jewish people of prioritizing Talmud Torah (Torah study) more than other things (such as having a non or serving in the IDF). Torah study is important, but presumably full time Torah study is not something most people except for a small group of scholars, rabbis, and poskim are meant for? What’s the hashkafa here?

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The text of the 10 commandments differs in parshas Yisro and Eschanan. What are the accepted explanations for the differences. Which text was actually written on the luchos? Is there an opinion that 1 was the text on the 1st luchos and the other on the 2nd luchos?   Another question. I know several people who passed away without children - distant relatives and friends. Is there any inyan for me to light a yarhzeit light for them on their yarhzeit or is it only for the children to do? Many thanks

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Dear Rabbi Rashi Commentary - Perek 6 Pasuk 4 “and also afterward: Although they had seen the destruction of the generation of Enosh when the ocean rose up and inundated a third of the world, the generation of the Flood did not humble themselves to learn from them.” Question - My Torah Chavrusa partner and I are a bit mystified by the Rashi’s statement above. “Inundated a third of the world”, in order for this to be viable there would have been two floods. The evil generation was not humbled by the first wave (third of the world etc.). so, there would have to of been a second wave that destroyed all humanity save Noach’s ark. Can you shed some light on this? Thank you.