Question
Rabbi, Concerning blessing of our families, a husband will bless his wife and recite Eishet Chayil, then bless his children, May G-d make you like Ephraim and Manasseh; May God make you like Sarah, Rebecca, Rachel and Leah. Is there any precedent for a woman to bless her husband in like manner? Thank you for your time. Shalom jd

Question
What are the requirements for the weekly Shabbat bread as far as the kind of bread and how it is made?

Question
Ayin~Shin~Yud~Resh - "a'shir" means "rich, wealthy" Shin~Ayin~Yud ~Resh " - "sa'ar" means hairy, shaggy, buck, he-goat Shin~Ayin~Yud~Resh - "Se'ir" means the "hairy"or "shaggy" patriarch of "Chorites," the inhabitants of Edom before the descendants of Esav The words: "a'shir" as rich, and "sa'ir"as he-goat, and" Se'ir" as hairy Choriy Edom Esav all share the same " letters of light." Are the "wealthy"as Esav "greedy" goats? Do riches sever the soul from sacredness? These words seem to imply that silver and gold "ensnare" one's soul. So, is having enough sufficient enough?

Question
gan ~ (Gimmel Nun) garden~enclosure~fig of bride~Garden of Eden. The following words contain gan (Gimmel Nun): goren ~threshing floor~barn~corn~void place (Gimmel Resh Nun) Isn't the heart a threshing place for stamping out iniquity? ragan~Verb~rebel~ grumble~murmur~backbiter~(Resh~Gimmel~Nun) Wouldn't whispering and complaining occur inwardly? Goshen "drawing near" (Gimmel~ Shin ~Nun) Isn't the place where G-d is nearest us is inside the heart chamber. anag~Verb~to be soft~ dainty pliable~effeminate~ delight (Ayin Nun Gimmel) Aren't these actions derived in the heart? Of course gan (Gimmel Nun) may not always be heart related, however this word gan (Gimmel Nun) has a much deeper meaning beyond its surface meaning.  

Question
Out of necessity for professional reasons, I moved to an area where there is only one shul within a reasonable walk. It considers itself Orthodox. But there are two concerns I have about this shul. One is that most members are not orthodox and they drive to shul on Shabbos. That in itself is nothing new to me. The difference here is this minyan exists because of people breaking Shabbos. There are far fewer than ten men who come in a Shomer Shabbos manner. The other concern I have is there is someone who was born female and underwent a series of medical procedures to become male. He is treated as a man, sits in the men's section, leads service, gets aliyos, and reads Torah. And when there are just ten men including him, he gets counted in a minyan. He also shakes hands with all the men, including me, which I have not resisted because I don’t want to be rude. He is actually very nice and personable. Wondering about this, I quietly asked the rabbi about him, and rather than stating any halacha pertaining to sex changes, he simply told me “he is good at what he does.” As a rabbi, what is your perspective on this situation?

Question
If, while reciting Atah Chonantanu after Shabbat, one mistakenly skips or mispronounces one or more words in the paragraph, does one still fulfill their requirement to perform activities not permitted on Shabbat? Or are Shabbat-restricted activities still prohibited?

Question
My boyfriend and I recently moved to a new apartment. Most of the people who live are Orthodox Jews. We are not Jewish and feel somewhat out of place here. We want to be wanted and to get along with our neighbors. One Orthodox couple here has welcomed us as neighbors, went out of their way to greet us and made us feel at home here, and now they want us to join them for a Sabbath meal. They seem very open minded and are interested in being our friends.   But we have no idea what to expect at a Sabbath meal. We are nervous about accepting this invitation. We would like to know is there anything special we should do? What should we say to them? What type of food can we expect them to serve? How can we reciprocate? They told us to wear whatever we want, but seriously, should we dress any particular way?