Question
Hi! I was wondering if I can use this certain make up product on yom tov/shabbat- it’s a liquidy product, it’s kind of like this sort of liquidy thing that u rub in like a moisturizer and it makes you more tan. I was wondering if I can use it since a lot of people use lip gloss since it has a runny consistency. Thank you!

Question
We have 2 non-jewish neighbors that have automatic lights on their driveway. We try to go as far off the street as possible but still end up activating the lights on our way home from shul. Is this an averah? What should we do if so?

Question
Shalom aleichem Rabbi Lauffer, thank you for answering my last question. If one fasts all day on Shabbos but eats after sundown on Saturday, would he have to fast another day for having fasted on Shabbos, or would the fact that he ate, albeit after sundown, cause it to be regarded as if he didn't fast on Shabbos, and he would thus not have to fast another day. Thanks.

Question
Scientists are currently working on developing thought-activated electronics. They would be able to do things like turning a light on and off just by wishing it that way. Suppose one lived in (or was visiting) a house that had a thought activated light. Such thoughts are difficult to control. What would one do on Shabbat?

Question
I always thought you cannot do things to prepare for after Shabbat. And you cannot carry anything within an eruv that you plan to use solely after Shabbat. But I’ve faced a common scenario where I go over someone’s house for a Shabbat meal and they offer me leftovers and other food to take home that realistically there is zero chance I will eat during Shabbat. They get offended if I say no. When I explain the laws of the eruv, which are printed explicitly in the eruv guidebook everyone has, they act like it doesn’t apply in this situation. Many people get upset that I act like a know-it-all when all I am trying to do is follow Jewish law. Even some rabbis I go over sometimes offer me food to take home. This appears to be widespread practice in our community as many view the eruv as a free-for-all. What should I do about this?

Question
The shul I attend has some members who are not fully observant who drive there. One of them is an elderly gentleman who walks with a cane. This past Shabbos, he dropped some of his change on the floor (which is muktzeh). He was determined to retrieve it all himself. But I thought it would be a hazard for him to bend down and pick it all up, and I did it for him. Did I do the right thing? No one else seemed to notice.