Question
In some places (like Mishlei 3:3 and 7:3) our hearts are compared to luchot, tablets, on which one should enscribe the words of HaShem. In another places our hearts should be circumcised (Devarim 10:16) which seems to be about cutting of our evil affections (Yirmiyahu 4:4) (see also Devarim 30:6), to remove wickedness. Yet again in other verses (like Ezekiel 11:19, 36:27) it says the heart of stone will be replaced by the heart of flesh: Rabbi Levi in the name of Rabbi Hama bar Hanina said: "G-d’s laws are called hukkim because they are engraved (hakukim) as a safeguard against the Yetzer Hara (the evil inclination)." Rabbi Levi elaborated: "This can be compared to an outpost threatened by brigands. What did the king do? He sent a guard to protect it. So, too, the Holy One Blessed be He said: The Torah is a rock and the Evil Inclination is a rock. The Torah (a harder rock) will defend against the Evil Inclination (a less hard rock) – ‘’I will remove the heart of stone from your body.” All of these seem to talk about our hearts, the words of Torah which should be on them, and the evil inclination which should be removed from them. So what I would like to know is: What's the difference, and what is the common denomitor, between a heart that needs to be engraved/written on, a heart that needs to be circumcised and a heart that needs to be transformed into a heart of flesh. And what should one learn from this?

Question
1. The Israelites ate manna during ALL 40 years that they wandered in the desert. Is that correct? 2. Did they also eat quail during ALL 40 years? 3. I found conflicting passages about quail. Exodus 16:1 On the fifteenth day of the second month after their departure from the land of Egypt, the Israelites started complaining. So G-d provided manna. Manna fell for them on the sixteenth of Iyar. Exodus 16:13 is the first time that quail is mentioned. Quail were provided at night. Was this provision of quail a one-time occurrence or every night? Numbers 11:18–20 seems to indicate that G-d provided quail for 30 days only until the Israelites were sick of eating it. At what point during the 40 years did this occur? Thanks.

Question
Dear Rabbi, "Pareve" is a very common term. Has it always been this way, and when did it originate? Also, what is the source of the word? Thank you.

Question
Hello I asked you: "according to biblical Hebrew or Hebrew grammar Does the pronominal suffixes in Isaiah 11:2-5 refers to (נֵ֖צֶר) in isaiah 11:1? (apart from any commentary) " And you answerd me: " The word “netzer” means shoot but it is referring to the Messiah. The verses that follow on after it are references to the Messiah which means that they are referring to the word “netzer”." Another question: Could you please tell me a little about this Hebrew structure, even in a sentence? For instance why is it that the Pronominal suffixes in (Isaiah 11:2-5) don't go back to(חֹ֖טֶר) in (Isaiah 11:1) and go back to(נֵ֖צֶר) ?

Question
I asked you about what the pronominal suffixe in Isaiah 11:2 refers to, and thank you for your response. But there's still one grammatical question: According to biblical Hebrew or Hebrew grammar does the pronominal suffixes in Isaiah 11:2-5 refers to (נֵ֖צֶר) in isaiah 11:1? (apart from any commentary)?