Question
Hello Rabbi, My wife and I are having a bit of a disagreement. I don’t know what right thing to do. My question is: at what age can I take my daughter to visit her grandfather’s gravesite? A little background: I was born in Russia. I moved to America when I was 5. Most Russia Jews are not very religious but share a lot of values and traditions. One thing I was raised to believe is that you don’t take children with living parents to cemeteries, unless the child is old enough or married. The issue is my wife’s father who passed 6 months ago, and my wife is only 25. She is having a hard time with the passing. Now, after 6 months, my daughter who is 7 years old is starting to get sad and cries at random times. When we ask her what’s wrong, she says that she misses grandpa. My wife thinks that taking her to visit her grandpa at the cemetery will help, and stop our daughter from having those moments of sadness/crying. I grew up with a tradition to not bring children to cemeteries and am very uncomfortable with this idea. Plus, I think this will not help, and may actually make it worse. I think we should find other ways to deal with those moments. I would love some advice and guidance in this matter. Thank you

Question
Can you do sitting shiva for your grand ma or grand ante even if you do not stay at the place where she lived? My grand ante passed away last Sunday, so 8 days ago, and I believe has been buried today or tomorrow

Question
Dear Rabbi, I heard there is a custom to light a special, long-burning candle on one’s parent's yahrzeit (date of the anniversary of passing). Why? Thanks.
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Question
Good Morning Rebbeim - My (Jewish) friend just passed away. Unfortunately he had gone off the derech in a big way - married out, converted to Christianity (or so he thought), baptized his children - the whole nine yards. Is it proper to arrange Kaddish from him? And if his parents don't know the Hebrew name of their son (or their own for that matter), how is Kaddish said? Thank you.