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Ok so this question is odd but bear with me: From what I know, Jewishness is passed down via the mother. I also know that in the story of the Golem, he is granted life by a rabbi. Would the rabbi be considered his parent? And if so, would the golem be considered Jewish?

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I have been married for 35yrs. I almost walked out of my wedding. I did not find my wife very attractive and had concerns about her personality & character. I wanted to date other girls but had lost a parent recently and was not emotionally ready. I married out of fear not faith. As is we have three children. My relationship with them is decent but could be better if it wasn't for marital issues. I'm tired of the hurtful exchange. I have not been intimate with my wife for over 15 yrs including my honeymoon. I am 60 yrs old now. What to do? I have thought of separating but remaining friends and be there for one another. But don't know how to go about it, not sure if right thing to do and not much money.

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Dear Rabbi: When I was a kid, my father was not much of a religious man, but he often stated to my family his wish to be buried in Israel. He expected to live to an old age like his parents and grandparents did. Unfortunately, that didn’t happen and despite the appearance of good health, he died of a sudden heart attack in his forties when I was just 15. My mother, my siblings, and I could not afford to bury him in Israel and instead interred him locally at a ‘Jewish’ cemetery operated by a Reformed temple where many people who were not actually Jewish are buried. Now many years have passed. I am married with children, as are my siblings, and even my mother has remarried, and I have a close relationship with my stepdad and step siblings. Family life is great. But it still nags me to this day that my father didn’t get buried in Israel like he wanted. Today we have the money to transfer his coffin if that is possible. We don’t know if that’s a thing one can do. Does Jewish law allow this?

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Is it true that in ancient Israel a groom was able to use a representative (for example a friend or a brother) in a wedding ceremony, if he himself was unable to attend it due to a journey or something like that?

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We do not have a sotah ritual today. But I feel I have reasonable suspicion that my wife cheated on me decades ago before we had our kids. In the absence of the sotah ritual, what is a man supposed to do to find out the truth? Or his he supposed to inquire at all? I am nervous about confronting my wife directly. I have never been jealous, but I just want know. In our first two years of marriage, my wife hung out often with a man she considered her ‘best friend.’ I fully believed he was a platonic friend and approved and trusted her, even though they had dated before and decided not to marry each other. She went over his apartment often and they watched movies together as I worked until late in the evening. Then I got my dream job and we moved away and she lost all but occasional contact with him. We made new friends, started a family, and she stopped contacting him. I have had many happy years of marriage ever since. We have heard that he died about 10 years ago. If my suspicions are ever confirmed true, I have no intention of ending our marriage under any circumstances, regardless of anyone’s opinion. I know several couples who divorced over adultery. But I am the type to forgive, and I have already forgiven others for things that hurt me much more, and I will remain married to my beloved wife until death do us part. I just want to know one way or another for peace of mind’s sake. I would like to know what approach we typically use in Jewish tradition today to ascertain the truth when there is suspicion. We conceived no children during this period of time, but soon after we moved away, we did. I know for sure our firstborn daughter, who is now happily married with children of her own, is my biological child and not his because we have taken DNA tests.

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I dont spend quality tireza with my hasband, even when i do its not quality.

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Is a Kohen allowed to marry a Jewish woman who lost her virginity to him before marriage?

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Asking on behalf of a friend: I am a Jewish man and I am gay. I’m in a relationship with a non-Jewish man but we want to have a Jewish family. If we adopt children, will they be Jewish? What steps would we need to take to ensure our children are accepted? Does my partner need to formally convert? Do we need to have a Jewish wedding? Should we consider a Jewish surrogate so the child will “technically” have a Jewish mother? Please, if you can’t accept gay marriage do not answer this question. We are simply looking for answers as to how to give our future children the most acceptance we can within our community.