Question
Korean average IQ is 107. Ashkenazim Jews, 115. Are Jewish people are smart because of Torah study? Is there any connection between Torah study and Jewish intelligence?

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Did the flood in Noah’s time cover the entire planet with water and wipe out all civilization and animals? Or did it only affect the geographic region covered in the Torah? Were the Chinese, Native Americans, and Aborigines (just to name a few) affected by the flood? Or just those in and near the Middle East? Did Noah take all animal species from all parts of the world on board the ark, including kangaroos and llamas, for example? Or just those animals found in the biblical region?

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Was the full Torah that is written in the scroll today (The Five Books of Moses) given at Mt. Sinai? Or were just the Ten Commandments and previous events given to Moses and all the Jewish people there with the rest to come later? As we know, most of the Torah tells about events that occurred after Mt. Sinai. If the full Torah was given at Mt. Sinai, that means that everyone, including Moses, Aaron, and the entire nation would know in advance of their own actions and how they would behave, which could affect their own behavior.

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How we are supposed to academically, and religiously, understand the book of Daniel? Daniel is a noble Jewish youth of Jerusalem, taken into captivity by Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon. He serves the king and his successors with loyalty until the time of the Persian conqueror Cyrus, while remaining true to the God of Israel. Question, is this supposed to be Nebuchadnezzar II (605 BC – c. 562 BC) Most modern scholars see the book of Daniel as actually being written during the reign of the infamous Antiochus IV Epiphanes (175–164 BCE) (the villain of the Chanukah story), although based on older materials. Question: Do any classical, medieval, or modern Jewish rabbis also see it this way? Any info would be appreciated. In the book, knowledge of the Babylonian-Persian period (Nebuchadnezzar era) is vague or erroneous. For example, "Belshazzar (Bel-shar-user) is identified as the son of Nebuchadrezzar and is called "king" (5:1), but we have seen that his father was Nabonidus and that, though he was a regent, he never became a king. King Darius is called a Mede, the son of Xerxes (Ahasuerus), in Daniel 9:1, although we know that he was a Persian and the father of Xerxes. As the story moves into the Greek period, it becomes more accurate. The writer knows of the desecration of God's altar by Antiochus IV in 168 (9:27; 11:31) but not of the restoration of worship by Judas Maccabeus three years later. The book must have been completed between 168 and 165, probably closer to 165. The presence of Persian and Greek loan-words lends support to the Hellenistic dating." (Old Testament Life and Literature, Gerald A. Larue ) How do we understand this book in an authentically Jewish and also academically responsible way?  

Question
In Exodus 12 Moses tells the Israelites to keep the lamb “until” the 14th day of the 1st month and kill it at twilight. Does the word “ until” mean at the beginning of the 14th day or into the 14th day? Also was the lamb killed at the beginning of the 14th when the sun set just before darkness or later on in the afternoon of the 14th ?

Question
Is there anything in the Hebrew GRAMMAR that would prohibit this interpretation (#2 below) regarding who “he” refers to in Gen 32:25? Q: Who are the first two “he”s and the “him” referring to? Is it (1) “he” [the angel] saw that “he” [the angel] had not prevailed against “him” [Jacob] – or – (2) “he” [Jacob] saw that “he” [Jacob] had not prevailed against “him” [the angel]? If possible, it would read thusly: “When he [Jacob] saw that he [Jacob] had not prevailed against him [the man], he [the man] touched the socket of his [Jacob’s] thigh; so the socket of Jacob's thigh was dislocated while he wrestled with him." Jacob c. 91 years old - 28:1 (c. 77) ... 31:41 (20 years). Why would an angel not be able to prevail over any man, and esp. a 91 yr old man? And, why would the angel allow the man to wrestle with him “until daybreak”? IF the proposed suggestion above is allowable, it was to teach Jacob a lesson, i.e., God’s blessing could not be attained by his own strength and cunning, but through faith and dependance on God as he did in his fervent prayer (Hos 12:4).

Question
In Genesis 1:26 and again in 1:28 a word is often translated as "dominion" or "rule over." What is that word in Hebrew? I have heard that there is a connection between that word and shepherding-- is this true? And lastly, the charge to "rule over" seems to be connected to "according to the likeness of us, in image of us"-- seemingly to mean to "rule over" as our Creator would "rule over", and in the context of the Creation story: as a creator. Any comments will be appreciated. Thank you.