Question
This pertains to those who are using WELLS for the water supply. Wells that use ELECTRICITY to draw the water up and into the house. Therefore, ON SHABBAT: when using the 'faucet' or when flushing the 'toilet,' electricity is being used in the same way as when 'switching' on the light switch, for which on Shabbat there is a special cover to prevent turning on or off, or is on a timer to stay on until whenever. So, why is this 'allowable'?   2. This pertains to opening and closing the refrigerator and/ freezer door ON SHABBAT: Although the inside light is unscrewed so as not to 'come on' when the door is opened, the compressor (or whatever it is called), which uses electricity, 'comes' on (via electricity) when the door is opened. Why is this allowable?  

Question
I am reading Jonathan Rabb's book "Among the Living". In the story, a rabbi looks at a Havdalah spice box, specifically at the Hebrew lettering on the inscription. The rabbi says that the letter gimmel is in the wrong place, because non-Jews did the craftsmanship and they did not read Hebrew. I know that the spice box is the besamim box. What letters are on a typical spice box? What words do they represent? Is the letter gimmel one of those letters?

Question
"If you make an altar of stones for me, do not build it with dressed stones, for you will defile it if you use a tool on it." (Shemot 20:25) So, how was the altar made?

Question
If Shabbat is supposed to be “a day of rest,” why is it forbidden to do certain things that don’t seem to be “real work,” such as turning a light on or off? Thank you!