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Hello! To preface this, I must say that I myself am not Jewish. Rather, I am emailing you on behalf of my younger cousin, who is. I apologize if this isn't the kind of questions that you usually handle. My cousin, Hannah, is 10. Her mother was Jewish, while Hannah's father (my uncle) is not (he's agnostic, most of our family is agnostic or some denomination of Christian). However, Hannah's mother unfortunately died when she was quite young, leaving my uncle to raise her alone. Hannah has expressed that she feels estranged from her Jewish heritage, and very much wants to connect. Our family is fully supportive of this, but also at a bit of a loss on how to help her in this. She has no immediate Jewish relatives, and dropping her off at the nearest synagogue once a week alone makes her father uncomfortable. Would it be appropriate for him to accompany her? Another concern is her bat mitzvah. It is our understanding that a proper bat mitzvah involves a lot of planning on the parent's part, and a lot of studying for Hannah to prepare. Could you offer some insight into how we can best support her and help her reconnect with her culture (and possibly religion)? For reference, we live in Colorado in the U.S..
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Hi, I've seen an answer to a question on here saying that a person whose mother's mother was Jewish is, by matrilineal descent, also Jewish. If it's an unbroken matrilineal line, is this true 100% of the time or is there a limit regarding how far back the relative is? I ask because my mother's mother's mother (my great-grandmother) was Jewish and, living in WWII Germany, she stopped practising. As such my grandmother, mother and myself were raised without religion. Are we all still considered Jewish? I feel that I've been denied a part of my family's culture, especially since I never got a chance to talk to my great-grandmother about it before she passed. I'd like to reconnect with it and come to understand my family better. Next year I'm moving to a city that has a beautiful Orthodox synagogue and I'm considering reaching out to the Rabbi but that's a bit intimidating so I thought I'd ask here first.

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Dear Rabbi, I was born and raised in Cincinnati, the daughter of Polish immigrants, as a devout Catholic. I married an Italian-American man and we had three girls we likewise raised Catholic. It never once crossed my mind that my ancestors could be anything else. I recently took a DNA test that gave me shocking results. It says I am 99.8% Ashkenazi Jewish. I wonder what to make out of this. I have not known any Jews since my childhood. My parents are long gone. I am a 78-year-old widow. My only living sibling has Alzheimer’s and can no longer communicate. I have no living relatives I know personally from Poland who I can ask. The only family I have around are my children, their husbands, and my seven grandchildren. I thought maybe I could ask a rabbi what to do and this is what came up from a Google search about asking a rabbi. Sincerely, Ann Murio

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Shalom I am sure you have been asked this question time and time again. I am hoping to receive the answer I am looking for. My grandmother met a Jewish man. My grandmother then converted to Judaism prior to getting married. My mother was then conceived and born. She went to Hebrew school and practiced Jewish traditions. I am looking for G-d. I have been reading about Judaism and would like to know. Am I Jewish? Would I be accepted by the Jewish community if my grandmother was a convert? Thank you for your time.
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I recently discovered that my mother's mother was Jewish. I wasn't raised as a Jew. Am I considered a Jew? Should I just ignore this ancestry tidbit?