Question
We are a Kohen family and my toddler seems to be a lefty. I've heard that a lefty Kohen cannot do the service when the Temple is rebuilt. Should we encourage him to write with his right hand for this reason? But every time we've tried to get him to use his right hand instead of his left, he says its not comfortable and won't color or write.
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Question
Dear Rabbi, I understand the reason for married women covering their hair is modesty, yet today a lot of the sheitles (wigs) woman wear are nicer than their real hair. I think the wearing of make-up can be viewed in the same manner. It improves the person's appearance - doesn't this contradict the laws of modesty?

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My question is about tithing. I was taught that there were three tithes. One for the "work" (which would be for the "Levites"; one for our use at the Chag Feasts; and a third tithe every third and sixth year of a 7-year cycle which was used for the poor (widows and orphans). I have been doing a lot of studying into tithing lately and I see something different in the scriptures. Namely, it looks to me as if there is only one tithe. That tithe is for us to use for the Feasts. A heave offering (amount unspecified) of that tithe is given to the "Levites" (for the work) and they tithe on that tithe (tithe of the tithe). Then every third year, we use the tithe within our gates, i.e., do not travel to the Feast, and share it with the widows and orphans. This is a simple summary. I would appreciate your input as to how Jews handle tithing, that is, is my current assessment correct, or is there something that I am missing?

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Why are we commanded to make our ritual objects beautiful? I am a Jewish graphic designer and illustrator, and I specialize in making ketubot [marriage contract documents]. Thank you.

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Shalom aleichem Rabbi Lauffer. Thank you for answering my last question. I came across something in the Artscroll Shmuel Aleph that might have a bearing on a question Rabbi Lauffer answered for me a couple years ago, but I'm not sure if it does or not. I asked Rabbi Lauffer "Is one allowed to do a coin flip in order to determine the result of a sports competition that he is betting on, or is this prohibited because of what the Shulchan Aruch (Y.D. 179:1) writes that “One should not inquire from stargazers and not through lotteries" and Rabbi Lauffer graciously answered me saying, "Personally, I think that it is forbidden. The Sages teach that it is sometimes permissible to do certain actions that are comparable to stargazing and the like but only when there is some kind of a connection between the "omen" and the thing that it is being done for." The note in the Artscroll Shmuel p. 243 writes "According to Radak, omens are prohibited only if they reflect commonly accepted superstitious belief. However, a person is permitted to devise a sign to aid him in making a decision. Thus, the Talmud's citation of Jonathan does not mean to state that his action was impermissible. On the contrary, the Talmud's use of Jonathan's incident is to teach that it is appropriate to rely only on an omen that has been clearly stipulated in advance. A disquieting incident that has not been specified in advance only appears like a bad omen, and should be given no credence. Rema assumes that Radak's interpretation of the verse is coincident with the opinion of Raavad [and in opposition to that of Rambam], and Rema cites these two valid opinions regarding the use of omens (Yoreh Deah 179:4)." According to this Rema cited in the Artscroll, would doing a weighted coin flip on a calculator be permitted to decide the winner of a sports contest that one is betting on, or would it be forbidden as Rabbi Lauffer paskens. Thanks a lot.
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Question
Dear Rabbi: Unfortunately my wife (Yael bat Channah) is now already nearly a year in hospitals and Rehab Nursing Homes. She has many times been unconscious, not aware of what was going on, but thank G-d her health has improved and she understands now most of the things, that happen around her. At home I continued always to candle the lights for Shabbos and Chanuka, even when she couldn't. If I bring her electric Shabbos candles and an electric Menora, can she say the bracha over the light kindling? Real fire is not allowed in the Hospital or Nursing Home. Too dangerous.
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