Question
Hi, if someone was Jewish but had no proof and needed to convert giyur or giyur lechumra and met someone who wanted to convert, would the beit din still convert them both if they were married, as they met out of love for Judaism and not one converting for marriage?

Question
My name is Aaron and I was born and raised Jewish in the conservative and orthodox movement. I am a 39 year old single father raising my 8 year old daughter by myself. I married and had a baby with someone that is not Jewish. I got divorced in 2019, and have been raising my daughter by myself for 3 years. I have sole custody of my daughter, Azaria, and I have been raising her Jewish. My daughter knows many of the prayers, works on Hebrew everyday, and has read from the torah. I want my daughter to be able to possibly make aliyah with me in the future, or marry someone orthodox. She goes to a private Jewish school. I want to have my daughter converted to Judaism. Would I be able to have her converted in an orthodox conversion? If so, what would be required of us to have her converted in an orthodox conversion? Or would I have to have her converted in a conservative conversion? I am also worried that because we are not walking distance to a synagogue we won't be able to get an orthodox conversion. We live a few blocks from her school, but many miles to a synagogue.

Question
Hi Rabbi, I have a question: Let us assume that there are non-human persons that exist who travelled to our planet and possess intelligent thought. Would it be possible for one of them to convert to Judaism and be considered a part of the Jewish People? In the same vein of questions: If they have food very different from ours, how could we distinguish what is kosher and what is not? Thanks!

Question
I grew up in a Jewish family, was raised going to shul, and had a bat mitzvah. I've been active at my university's Hillel, and my Jewish identity is really important to me. I'm almost 22 years old, and I just found out that my grandmother on my mother's side isn't Jewish (although her husband, my grandfather, was). My mother and her family are from the Soviet Union, and she was raised with all of the stigma and struggle associated with being Jewish (as well as with Jewish cultural practices). My mom has always identified as Jewish, so I never thought to ask about our family history. I'm not quite sure what to do -- I know that this means that I'm not Jewish, but my identity and how people view me hasn't changed. I know that Jewishness is matrilineal, so I would need to convert in order for my children to be considered Jewish, but what would the conversion process look like for me? Would it be different than the standard process in any way?