Question
Moses died on the seventh of Adar. The Talmud proves this as follows- 1. In Deuteronomy 34:8 we read that the Jews mourned for thirty days following Moses' death. 2. The book of Joshua begins with G‑d's command to bring the Jewish people across the Jordan River. G‑d specifies that they are to cross in three days time. This instruction was given immediately after Moses died, meaning at the earliest possible opportunity after his death. This would have been following the thirty days of mourning. 3. In Joshua 4:19 we are told that the Jews crossed the river on the tenth of Nissan. If we subtract the three days between the command and actual crossing, plus the thirty days of mourning, we find the date of Moses' passing is the seventh of Adar. Your answer to one of my previous questions was that the month of ADAR always has 29 days, except when there are two months of Adar, then the first one always has 30 days. My understanding is that Sheloshim for 30 days starts after burial. Am I correct that Moses died and was buried on the same day? Did the Jews start mourning for Moses on the same day as he died? Thanks.

Question
Was the full Torah that is written in the scroll today (The Five Books of Moses) given at Mt. Sinai? Or were just the Ten Commandments and previous events given to Moses and all the Jewish people there with the rest to come later? As we know, most of the Torah tells about events that occurred after Mt. Sinai. If the full Torah was given at Mt. Sinai, that means that everyone, including Moses, Aaron, and the entire nation would know in advance of their own actions and how they would behave, which could affect their own behavior.

Question
Good evening! I recently read the book of Ezekiel Chapters 40-48 and was very surprised to read that there will be animal sacrifices in the New Temple.

Question
Looking at different explanations regards Avodah Zarah, different/various forms of idolatry, I tried to sum things up, I tried to get to get a definition out of it based on their common denominator. Avodah Zarah (strange service/worship); The adjective in ‘strange service’ has two senses. One is the strangeness of the object toward which the service/worship is directed, not the ‘proper G-d’ but other ‘gods’. The other refers to the method of service/worship, strange in the sense one serves in a matter that is strange to the Torah, strange to the ‘proper’ way of service. [which in essence could imply the belief in certain idea, image or object]. So we got a strange method of worship one the one hand and strange object of worship on the other. Is this what Avodah Zarah is? Or is there more to it? And secondly I would like to know what drives or causes a person to do Avodah Zarah in the first place; i.e. what lies at the core of it? Is there a reason why it’s so hard to serve the ‘proper’ G-d in a ‘proper’ way?