Question
Dear Rabbi, "Pareve" is a very common term. Has it always been this way, and when did it originate? Also, what is the source of the word? Thank you.

Question
Sometimes I travel by airplane with a carry-on only and no checked luggage. Included in my carry-on are my tefillin and siddur. Airport regulations prohibit leaving luggage unattended or with a stranger. What is one supposed to do if they have to use the restroom at the airport, but their tefillin and siddur are in their luggage that must be kept with them and therefore brought into the restroom?

Question
As we know, there are two main forms of Hebrew: Ashkenazi and Sefardi. And the most notable difference between them is the pronunciation of the last letter, the ת, as either an S or a T. Though the T-sound is considered Sefardi, I hear plenty of Ashkenazim using it. And I hear people who constantly switch around between the two, using them interchangeably, sometimes even in the same verse! (Example “YiTgadal V’YiSkadash”) How important is it to pronounce this letter according to one’s heritage? If one pronounces it differently from one’s family custom, is the prayer or blessing still valid? If a Torah reader pronounces it unlike his tradition, must he be corrected? How about if one suddenly decides to change because he joins a congregation that does it the other way or simply wants to?

Question
HI. I recently made a car rental reservation for an upcoming trip. I only have to pay when I pick up the car and can cancel the reservation before that. I then found a lower price with another company. Can I make a reservation with the 2nd company but still keep the first one, just in case there is an issue with the 2nd company when I get there?

Question
Hi-- I'm trying to find out more about the Ana BaKoach prayer. I know it is traditionally said during Kabbalat Shabbat. Is there another place in our daily or weekly liturgy where I might find it? Do you know when it first appeared as a prayer? What else can you tell me about it? Thanks!

Question
Hi, what is the basic Jewish view of organ donation and transplants? I know that in general that autopsies are seen as a desecration of the body, but what if a person's organs will save another person's life?