Question
Is there any requirement in Jewish law to name your child a Jewish or Hebrew name? I am pregnant with my first daughter. I want to name her after my grandmother. My grandmother was not Jewish (my mother converted before my parents met). But she was still my grandmother. She was my favorite person I ever knew. I spent more time with her than with my parents when I was growing up because my parents both worked. She made me who I am today. And though she was a devout Christian who attended church every Sunday, she was close to the Jewish community. Almost all her friends were Jews, and her Jewish friends inspired my mother’s conversion, something she was very proud of. She had more exposure in her life to Judaism than her own faith. She understood Jewish laws and traditions well and kept a kosher home so we could all eat there. She was an incredible woman who is very deserving. I think of her as a ger tzedek. The times I had with her were the best times I ever had. Sadly she passed away four years ago and I miss her very much. I want to name a daughter after her and call her by that name. The name she had is not biblical and is very popular among Christians but almost unheard of among Jews. There is no Hebrew equivalent and are no existing Hebrew names that remotely resemble it.

Question
I recently had a scary experience. I got a flat tire and stopped at the first tire shop I could find to get it fixed. I was in a rural area, far from any Jewish population. I was the only customer there at the time. Two men who appeared in their forties were working there. As they were changing my tire, the men were having a lively conversation in which they were saying some vicious antisemitic things. They sounded so hateful in the way they were talking. They were describing conspiracies blaming Jews for problems in this world. I wasn’t dressed in a manner that screamed Jew. I had on a polo shirt, jeans, and a baseball cap. And I do not have an identifiably Jewish name or look. They had no clue that I, a Jew, was in their presence as they were mouthing away. I was relieved to have my tire changed and be out of that place, hopefully never to go near there again. My one regret was not secretly videotaping it to show others and expose them. I truly believe that one who behaves like this cannot sincerely apologize for their feelings or actions. They can only feel sorry for the consequences they might face if caught. What is the appropriate way to act when faced with this predicament? Should one stay safe and keep quiet and hope to not get noticed? Or be brave and speak up about being Jewish and confront them? I wanted to be safe and I chose the first option.

Question
While studying this weekend, I came across a parsha which is somewhat confusing. After inquiring on the internet, I have yet to find an orthodox or Hasidic site explanation of the following text. What is Hashem telling Jeremiah? Jeremiah 8:8-9 How can you say, “We are wise, And we possess the Instruction of the LORD”? Assuredly, from the lying pens of scribes! The wise shall be put to shame, Shall be dismayed and caught; See, they reject the word of the LORD, So their wisdom amounts to nothing. אֵיכָ֤ה תֹֽאמְרוּ֙ חֲכָמִ֣ים אֲנַ֔חְנוּ וְתוֹרַ֥ת יְהֹוָ֖ה אִתָּ֑נוּ אָכֵן֙ הִנֵּ֣ה לַשֶּׁ֣קֶר עָשָׂ֔ה עֵ֖ט שֶׁ֥קֶר סֹפְרִֽים׃ הֹבִ֣שׁוּ חֲכָמִ֔ים חַ֖תּוּ וַיִּלָּכֵ֑דוּ הִנֵּ֤ה בִדְבַר־יְהֹוָה֙ מָאָ֔סוּ וְחׇכְמַ֥ת מֶ֖ה לָהֶֽם Are these scribes those who interpret the written Torah for the Jewish people? B"H